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Give Your Man's School Spirit Some Style

Back in the 20th century at our school (that would be pre-2000),  most of the men and boys wore collared shirts to football games....button downs and ties for the fraternity boys and collared shirts for the alumni boys.  Maybe even an old school sweater vest peppered in here and there.  



There is something to say, though, about the advancement in adorable t-shirt designs in mens and womens gameday gear.  Because of this, there's a whole lot of t-shirt wearin' going on on Gamedays everywhere.   My personal favorites are those tees promoting school spirit in a retro kind of way.  Distant Replays, www.distantreplays.com, is a cleverly named outfitter of vintage looking men's t-shirts. 


 In a beautiful, good looking, dapper world of perfection, all of our men would still be wearing sport coats and fedoras on Gameday.  Who are we kidding, though?  Boys will be boys and will be perfectly happy and stylish in these fun and classic looking tees from Distant Replays.


Bear down, Zona!

War Eagle!

Lil' Red

Mizzou-Rah!

Old Hokie

Go Pokes!




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