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Xs and Os: Object of the Game

A lot of us know what football is all about, but can we put it into words?  When it comes to the Xs and Os of football, here is the object of the game:


The team on Offense tries to move the ball down the field (called a Drive) by running or passing and finally crossing the defense's goal line to score.


The opposing team on Defense's job is to stop the Offense by:

  • Taking the ball away by recovering a loose ball (called a Fumble or Turnover)
  • Catching a pass thrown by the Offense's Quarterback (called an Interception)
  • Forcing the opponent to kick the ball (called a Punt)

{Wow, when you hear it that way it seems so easy!}


All Xs and Os posts are adapted from the Coach Bass College Football Map.  Coach Bass's maps are a fold out "Beverage and Mustard Proof" {not kidding!} map that defines and explains the game of College Football.  I would bet you might see a woman folding out one of these babies at a game, but a man would not be caught dead doing so.  I think it's an ingenious item that Coach Tom Bass came up with.  Buy them at http://coachbass.com.


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